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Gentiana calycosa Pleated gentian

 

This plant requires a moist, cool soil in part shade. In Parkdale YYC it begins to bloom in mid-July. The striking deep, intense blue colouring makes it conspicuous and it all “All parts of this plant…are poisonous if ingested.”*

Gentians are among the loveliest of mountain wildflowers and are rock-garden favorites. The genus honors King Gentius of Illyria, ruler of an ancient country on the east side of the Adriatic Sea, who is reputed to have discovered medicinal virtues in gentian plants.” (LBJWC)

References

*Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center (LBJWC) The University of Texas at Austin.

Folksonomy: xeriscape,

Heliopsis helianthoides False Sunflower or Sunflower Heliopsis

This showy tidy perennial is the Tuscan Gold hybrid of the common False Sunflower or Sunflower Heliopsis, part of the Proven Winners® collection. It has has attractive foliage and large blossoms. The sunflower is native to North America.

Light full sun and partial sun
Hardiness zone 4-9
Size H: 24″ – 32″ W: 20″
Blooms mid- to late summer – July
Colour Yellow
Bloom shape Daisy-like
Compact Upright
Group class
Care Can be deadheaded but this is not essential
Yes
Leaves Attractive dark green leaves are good for bouquets.
Water Moderate. Water regularly
Shape Compact rounded
Attracts butterflies
Garden styles Cottage, Traditional, Eclectic, Prairie
Fertilizer
Soil Average soil for best performance
Features: Showy perennial, long-blooming, large blossoms that are excellent cut flowers. Can be divided in spring or fall. It can be used as focal point plant, in mass planting or as a border Plant.

Rosa ‘Morden Sunrise’ Morden Sunrise Rose

This compact rose was introduced by Morden Research Station in Manitoba, Canada and was the first yellow flowering Parkland Rose.

The petals appears to glow with a graduated blend of pastel yellows, orange and peach. It is one of my favourites with its showy flowers, and continuous blossoms.

Light Sun and partial shade
Hardiness zone 3a
Size H: 4′ W: 4′ 100-125 cm to 100-125 cm
Blooms Continuous, June through to frost
Colour Coral orange and yellow
Bloom shape Cupped
Shrub rose
Group class Parkland Rose
Care High maintenance. Needs regular care and upkeep. Deadhead until end of August
Prune Trim to about 4-6″ in late winter/early spring when extreme cold has passed
Fragrant Yes
Leaves Glossy oval compound leaves
Water Moderate. Water regularly
Shape Compact rounded
Attracts butterflies, bees
Garden styles Cottage, Edible, Modern, Traditional
Fertilizer 3-10-10
Soil Normal, Sandy, Clay, Acidic, Dry
Hybridizer & year:
Features: Can also grow in planters. Very popular because of colour of double flowers and length of blooming period which extends into the fall.

Antennaria pussytoes

July 2, 2020

Antennaria pussytoes

Antennaria  is native to North America. It is waterwise and sustainable.

Antennaria  is also known as catsfoot, cat’s-foot, and everlasting. The flower resembles the pad of a cat’s paw.

Light Sun
Soil
Size H: W: cm to cm
Blooms late June early July
Colour Pink
Growth Fast
Leaves Silver-green
Native plant Yes
Fragrant
Waterwise Yes
Features:

Lychnis viscaria German catchfly

This easy-to-grow, Zone 3, old-fashioned perennial blooms from the middle of June and reaches its peak towards the end of June. Its cluster flowers on tall flower stalks, are a deep pink tall flower stalks and the foliage, which forms a grass-like mound, remains green late in the fall and appears again in early spring. It can be used for xeriscaping – once it is established, it is drought tolerant, does not need a lot of watering but does not like to dry out completely. It can grow in relatively dry areas but does better with enough moisture. This sturdy cottage garden plant, which is native to Europe, will grow in a container or in mass plantings, in a scree, alpine, or rock garden, and along the garden border. Ornamental grasses, Stachys byzantina Lamb’s-Ear, and other delicate flowers like the Campanula cochlearifolio Fairy Thimble Bellflower, and the Dianthus Red Border Pinks, make good companions. It is excellent for cutting. Other good cutting flowers that bloom at the same time include Mrs. Andrist Iris, roses, and catmint. It is a compact plant that can grow to about 24″ and spread to about 12″. It attracts butterflies and hummingbirds. It is a good choice for a naturalizing or woodland garden.

If faded flowers are deadheaded, it will flower longer.

In 2006 it was named as Heritage Perennials® Top 10 Perennial.

In early spring, clumps may be easily divided. It can live for at least five years.

Its name comes from its sticky stems.

Anemone canadensis windflower

It is difficult to believe that the dozens of pure white nodding windflower blossoms opening this week in different mounts and different beds in our Parkdale garden, all come from the one small plant I purchased years ago from wildaboutflowers.com It is such an exuberant plant that spreads by underground rhizomes stems and self-seeds, that it overwhelms other low growing plants nearby so I keep subdividing it. I will bring more to the Community Garden too. It was one of the first to bud and blossom. Its white scented blossoms contrast with its dark green leaves.

It grows well in the sun and in the shade. It prefers soil with even moisture. It spreads to about 15 inches. I use it as edging along the sidewalk and under the apple tree.

According to Wikipedia, “Anemone canadensis, also known as the Canada anemone, round-headed anemone, meadow anemone, or crowfoot, is a herbaceous perennial native to moist meadows, thickets, stream banks, and lake shores in North America, spreading rapidly by underground rhizomes, valued for its white flowers.”

According to the Missouri Botanical Garden its ”Genus name is often said to be derived from the Greek word anemos meaning wind.” They suggest that, ”Choosing companion plants for Anemone canadensis is tricky. Tall plants can cast so much shade that the anemone declines. Lobelia cardinalis, Liatris spicata and Amsonia tabernaemontana are colorful companions that provide a nice backdrop. Aquilegia canadensis and Sisyrinchium angustifolium ‘Suwannee’ have blooms that coincide with those of the anemone. Carex bicknellii would be a wonderful helpmate in situations where erosion is an issue.”

Almost in full-bloom on May 16, 2018 and on May 21, 2019. If it is cut back in spring, it will bloom again in fall.

Anemone canadensis windflower

This was taken on June 4, 2020 in Calgary.

Gentiana acaulis Trumpet Gentian

 

This Zone 2 perennial, with a striking “true blue” flower, was named as the Calgary Horticultural Society’s 2018 Perennial Plant of the Year. The striking deep blue blossoms stands out in the May to mid-June gardens in Calgary.

The Latin acaulis means “short-stemmed” and refers to the way the large stemless flower, which is shaped like a trumpet, sits on the low-growing clump of foliage. The mat of foliage can grow to over 12″ in width. Its deep green leaves are pointed.

Gentiana acaulis is native to Europe and grows in the mountainous regions in the Alps and Pyrenees.

It is named after Illyria’s King Gentius (180 BC).

It attracts bees and butterflies and is hare resistant.

It prefers rich, well-drained, evenly moist soil that is slightly acidic.

It can grow in part shade and in full sun but needs protection from the hot afternoon sun. A suggested companion plant is the Anemone canadensis Windflower, which also blooms in May and early June.

It is considered to be challenging plant to grow. It spreads slowly.

References

Janet Melrose. July 5, 2018. “Calgary Horticultural Society: 2018 Perennial Plant of the Year.” Gentiana acaulis Trumpet Gentian.

Jepson, Willis Linn (1975). A Manual of the Flowering Plants of California. University of California Press.

Viola adunca – Early blue violet

According to Alberta Plant Watch leaves of the early blue violet are “very high in Vitamins A and C, with 1/4 cups of these leaves having about the same amount of Vitamin C as 4 oranges.”

Ecology

Ants are attracted to early blue violets because of the violet seeds which have “special oily bodies called elaiosomes,” according to PlantWatch. Ants disperse the seeds as they carry them to their nests. “Once the ‘snack’ is removed from the seed, the seed is ready to germinate in the loose, open soil around the anthill.” These lovely early blooming plants have also spread into our neighbour’s lawn, thanks apparently to ants.

They bloom in my garden at the same time as the Aurinia saxatilis ‘Compacta’ Basket-of-Gold Alyssum.

I purchased one plant at Wildaboutflowers years ago and they are still popping up to my delight.

 

Light Sun to Shade
Soil prefers moisture
Size H: 3″ W: 6″ 4 cm to 10 cm
Blooms May to early June
Colour Bluish-purple
Growth Fast in ideal conditions
Leaves Heart or kidney-shaped
Native plant Yes
Fragrant Yes
Features: “Very high in Vitamins A and C, with 1/4 cups of these leaves having about the same amount of Vitamin C as 4 oranges.”

It attracts pollinators, bees and butterflies as well as birds.

Container planting


These photos were taken at Frank Pierce park on September 12, 2019.

One container has a green Dracaena spike for vertical interest, pink petunia and small yellow flowers as a filler, and sweet potato vine as a spiller.

Another container had cosmos as vertical interest, large blanket flower (yellows, browns) Rudbecka (yellows), and cosmos as fillers, and sweet potato vine as a spiller.

A third container had Bird of Paradise with a red flower as vertical interest, large blanket flower (yellows, browns) Rudbecka (yellows) and purple petunias as fillers.

  • Vertical interest
  • Fillers
    • Snapdragons
    • Petunia
    • Salvia
    • Lobelia
    • Viola
    • Lavender
    • Marigolds
    • Portulaca
    • Pansies
    • Nasturtiums
    • Geraniums
    • Hydrangea
  • Spillers
    • Sweet potato vine (green)
    • Sweet potato vine (purple)
    • Creeping Jenny
    • Coleus
    • Trailing petunia
    • million-bells
    • bacopa
    • verbena
    • Vinca Vine

Combinations include:

  • Vertical interest
  • Fillers
    •  Hydrangea
    • Marigolds
    • Portulaca
    • Pansies
    • Snapdragons
    • Nasturtiums
    • Geraniums
  • Spillers
    • Sweet potato vine (green)
    • Sweet potato vine (purple)
    • Creeping Jenny
    • Coleus
    • Trailing petunia
    • million-bells
    • bacopa
    • verbena
  • Suggested combinations
    • Impatience, with coleus, sweet potato vine
    • coleus, sweet potato vine and bird of paradise
    • Dwarf sunflower, yellow Snapdragon, celosia (wool flowers), Marigold, Lysimachia, and Potato vine

     

There are some annuals bedding plants and planters:

  • Snapdragons
  • Stevia x 6
  • Lemon grass x 6
  • Snapdragons
  • Petunia
  • Geranium (white and pink) & red for Dave
  • spikes

Perennials to add:

Herbs and flavour

  • Garlic
  • Parsley
  • Mint in container

Seeds

  • Sweet peas
  • Cosmos
  • Nasturtium
  • Marigold
  • Zinias
  • Sunflowers

Perennials to divide and/or move

Plants that need more room

  • Peony
  • Russian sage

Garden beds

  • Extend Spruced up bed east. Add more sedum.
  • New lilies in with other lilies? Move Iris.
  • Near front porch
    • Loosestrife, hardy pansies, lamium, sticky geranium, cat mint, yarrow
  • Dave’s raised beds
    • Carrots with beans, and, squash
    • Carrots with Rosemary, Sage, and Chives
    • Carrots with lettuce
    • Tomatoes
  • Susan’s self-watering planters. Needs new soil and compost.
    • #1 Stevia x 6
    • #2 carrots with dill or fennel, carrots with
    • #3 parsley
    • #4 mint
    • #5 lettuce spring mix (seed) and carrots
    • #6 lettuce spring mix (seed)
  • potatoes, tomatoes and squash together

Native grass

  • Sheep’s fescue
    • Front lawn. Over seed in May after deep raking, aerating, layer of compost

Native plants

  • Early blue violet

 

Container planting

 

  • Vertical interest
  • Fillers
    •  Hydrangea
    • Marigolds
    • Portulaca
    • Pansies
    • Snapdragons
    • Nasturtiums
    • Geraniums
  • Spillers
    • Sweet potato vine (green)
    • Sweet potato vine (purple)
    • Creeping Jenny
    • Coleus
    • Trailing petunia
    • million-bells
    • bacopa
    • verbena
  • Suggested combinations
    • Impatience, with coleus, sweet potato vine
    • coleus, sweet potato vine and bird of paradise